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Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog Fact File

Litoria chloris

Credit: Copyright. The Animal Facts.

Weight

Insufficient

Data

Length

68mm

(2.7in)

Lifespan

Wild Unknown

Captive 16 years

Diet

Carnivore

Insects

Conservation Status

IUCN

Least Concern

Look at Those Eyes!

The Australian red-eyed tree frog is appropriately named with a large red eye with a horizontal black pupil at its center.

As suggested in their name this species is found in Australia where they live along the east coast in the north of the country. Here they live in the forest spending much of their time in the trees.

Breeding takes place following a period of heavy rain which creates the small pools in which they will deposit their eggs.

They are threatened by habitat loss primarily through logging.

Read on to learn more about these arboreal amphibians.

Appearance

What does the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog look like?

The Australian red-eyed tree frog is coloured bright green on the back with a light yellow underside. Along the thigh is a streak of purple. Some have been found with light coloured spots on their back.

The eyes are orange at the centre moving to red on the outside. Their pupil is horizontal and colored black.

They have the ability to change their skin colour to match the environment they’re in.

This species will reach lengths of up to 68mm (2.7in) long. Females are slightly larger than males.

Adaptations

How does the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog survive in its habitat?


Their toes end with pads. The front feet are three quarters webbed and the back legs are fully webbed.

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Diet

What does the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog eat?

The Australian red-eyed tree frog is insectivorous. They feed upon insects.

Learn more about the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog in this video from FroggingAround on YouTube

Range

Where do you find the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog?

Australia is the native home of the Australian red-eyed tree frog. Here they can be found down the east coast from the middle of Queensland down to Sydney in New South Wales.

Habitat

Where can the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog survive?

They make their home in the riparian zones, flooded grasslands rainforest, woodlands and wet sclerophyll forests.

Reproduction

How does the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog produce its young?

Breeding takes place between October and February. This period follows the heavy rains in their territory which create the shallow pools necessary for them to breed.

A male will sit in one of these shallow pools and call to attract a female.

Following a successful mating the female lays her eggs in a mat on a pool of water. This is attached to some vegetation or floats to the bottom. Each clutch contains an average of 500 eggs with a female able to lay up to five clutches a year.

The tadpoles which hatch from these eggs are light brown with a gold or grey stripe and can grow up to 7.4cm (2.9in) long. The time at which they undergo Metamorphosis is determined by the temperature. At 27 degrees Celsius is takes roughly 41 days.

Sexual maturity is achieved between the 2nd and 3rd year.

Behavior

What does the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog do during its day?

The call of the Australian red-eyed tree frog is a series of ‘waaarks’ which is followed by a trill.

This species is primarily arboreal only descending from the trees to breed making them difficult to find in the wild. Breeding typically occurs following a period of heavy rain.

Credit: Copyright. The Animal Facts.

Predators and Threats

What stops the Australian Red-Eyed Tree Frog from surviving and thriving?

These animals are affected by habitat loss primarily for logging.

An emerging threat is the disease, Chytridiomycosis which is affecting a number of amphibian species globally.

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Quick facts

Until recently this species was regularly confused with the northern red-eyed tree frog which looks similar but has an orange thigh instead of the purple of the Australian red-eyed tree frog.

These frogs have been used in the testing of antibiotic peptides and water loss through evaporation.

References

Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke. 2004. Litoria chlorisThe IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T41083A10385326. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2004.RLTS.T41083A10385326.en. Accessed on 05 June 2022.

Periat, J. 2000. "Litoria chloris" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed June 05, 2022 at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Litoria_chloris/

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