Baby southern hairy nosed wombat helping her species at Taronga Zoo

baby southern hairy nosed wombatA baby southern hairy nosed wombat has been born at Taronga Zoo. The baby is a step forward in securing a future for these endangered creatures.

The baby was born 8 months ago and is now spending time out of mums pouch.

The joey has been named ‘Sydney’ and already her antics are entertaining visitors and staff.

Southern hairy nosed wombats are incredibly difficult to breed which makes the birth all the more exciting.

Brett Finlayson explained some secrets to the zoos success, ‘Compatibility and timing seem to be crucial ingredients for success, as the female is only receptive to the male for a 12 hour window.’

For mum Korra and dad Noojee this is their second baby in three years.

After mating it took three months for the baby southern hairy nosed wombat to become noticeable.

Keeper’s first indication of the baby was when her little foot popped out of the pouch.

‘Sydney still sleeps very close to her mum, but she’s starting to get more adventurous each day and it looks like she’ll be an energetic little one as she grows up’ said Finlayson.

Keepers believe that their success could assist another critically endangered species, the northern hairy nosed wombat which currently numbers only about 200 in the wild.

‘There’s no zoo-based breeding program for Northern Hairy-nosed Wombats at this time’ said Finlayson.

Finlayson explained how ‘if we can perfect and apply what we learn from our breeding program here to Northern Hairy-nosed Wombats in the future, the ramifications for this critically endangered species could be immense.’

Keepers believe they will be able to apply their successful formulae for breeding the wombats to allow this outcome.

Currently the baby southern hairy nosed wombat can be seen at the zoos backyard to bush exhibit.

Photo Credit: Taronga Zoo

By Cale Russell

TheAnimalFacts.com is a testament to Cale’s commitment to the education of people around the world on the topic of animals and conservation, through the sharing of topical and newsworthy information.

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