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Four Endangered Whooping Cranes Return to the Wild

Posted By : The Animal Facts Editorial Team

Date: November 16, 2021 2:20 am

Whooping Crane Release Audubon

One of the whooping cranes which is being released to the wild

Photo Credit: Audubon Nature Institute

Audubon Nature Institute have recommenced their efforts to restore the whooping crane with a release of four birds into White Lands Wetlands Conservation Area. Last year this species was not released due to the pandemic.

These four releases will join 75 whooping cranes which form part of a population being monitored by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. 

The four chicks which were released had been hatched and reared at Freeport-McMoRan Audubon Species Survival Center in New Orleans. This is the fourth year that chicks have been released in Louisiana. Prior to that they were moved North and released there.

“These four chicks represent a major comeback for our program,” said Freeport-McMoRan Audubon Species Survival Center Assistant Curator Richard Dunn. “We are so pleased to have bounced back after not being able to produce eggs or release cranes during the peak of the pandemic.” 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and Audubon have been longtime leaders in whooping crane conservation. They are working together to form a self-sustaining whooping crane population in Louisiana. The partnership is supported by Chevron, Hancock Whitney, USFWS, and other generous supporters.

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“At Chevron, we recognize the importance of protecting ecological diversity – the rich variety of wildlife on Earth, its ecosystems and species, and the ecological processes that support them,” said Public Affairs Manager for Chevron's Gulf of Mexico Business Unit Leah Brown. “We’re proud to continue our long-standing collaboration on whooping crane restoration and repopulation. Through awareness programs, educational efforts and volunteerism, we’re working to make sure this endangered species is thriving for generations to come.”  

“We continue to see progress in our whooping crane population project despite the setback from the pandemic,’’ said LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet. “Adding four more cranes, coupled with the cranes hatched in the wild last spring, is a positive step in our effort. We thank Chevron and our other corporate partners, along with Audubon, in our effort to restore this special bird to Louisiana.’’ 

If you see a crane in Louisiana you can report the sighting to LDWF – LDWF.

Learn more about the Audubon Nature Institute on their website – Audubon Nature Institute

Whooping Crane Release Audubon

One of the whooping cranes is fitted with a band and tracker prior to release

Photo Credit: Audubon Nature Institute

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