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San Antonio Zoo Celebrate Ectotherm Baby Boom

Posted By : The Animal Facts Editorial Team

Date: August 9, 2021 9:00 pm

Ectotherm Baby Boom San Antonio Zoo

A juvenile Mexican lance-headed rattlesnake which was born at the San Antonio Zoo

Photo Credit: San Antonio Zoo

The San Antonio Zoo have had a busy few weeks in their ectotherm department with the births of a range of reptiles, fish and amphibians leaving keepers delighted. A range of the species bred are threatened in some form in the wild.

Among the exciting births celebrated at the zoo are the La Palma pupfish and Charco Palma pupfish both of which are extinct in the wild. Other births included Henkel’s leaf-tailed geckoes, Minckley cichlids and Mexican lance-headed rattlesnakes.

Ectotherm Baby Boom San Antonio Zoo

A juvenile Henkel's leaf-tailed gecko which was born at the San Antonio Zoo

Photo Credit: San Antonio Zoo

Ectotherms are considered to be any animals which require any external source such as the sun to regulate their internal body temperature. It includes reptiles, fish and amphibians.

“This year has been a very successful year to date for the reproduction of San Antonio Zoo’s reptiles, amphibians, and fish,” said San Antonio Zoo Director of Ectotherms, Craig Pelke.

”Three Mexican lance-headed rattlesnakes were born in July, a Species Survival Program species and part of the Herpetology department’s Mexican montane reptile program, which was the first time since 2007. The Aquarium Department has reproduced 5 species of Mexican freshwater fish that range from endangered to extinct in the wild. Herpetology and Aquarium staff are doing everything they can to keep these endangered species around.”

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The two species of pupfish are extinct in the wild. The last sighting of the La Palma pupfish was in 1994 and the Charco Palma pupfish was last seen in 1995. Last year the zoo's aquarium team were recognized for their work with these species with the ZAA Ex-Situ Conservation award.

“San Antonio Zoo’s vision is to secure a future for wildlife,” said San Antonio Zoo President & CEO, Tim Morrow. “These births are testimony to the hard work and dedication our animal care specialists strive to every day. We are extremely proud to be leading the way in the conservation fight as we teach all our guests to Love, Engage with, Act for, and Protect animals and the places in which they live.”

Ectotherm Baby Boom San Antonio Zoo

A juvenile La Palma pupfish which was bred at the San Antonio Zoo

Photo Credit: San Antonio Zoo

San Antonio Zoo have a long history working to secure the future of wildlife and currently manage projects on three continents to preserve wildlife. They also run a range of programs focused on saving species locally in Texas.

Ectotherm Baby Boom San Antonio Zoo

Two juvenile Eastern Pilbra spiny-tailed skinks at the San Antonio Zoo

Photo Credit: San Antonio Zoo

Learn more about Reptiles here – Reptile Fact File | The Animal Facts

Learn more about the San Antonio Zoo on their website – San Antonio Zoo

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