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Andean Cock-of-the-Rock Fact File

Appearance

The Andean cock-of-the-rock male and female are visually distinct. The male has a striking bright red head with a large crest which wraps around over the beak.


Both males and females have the crest though it is larger on the males. Males also have red breast feathers. Down the back the wings and tail are black with a large white patch in the centre of the upperside. These wings are wide and strong to provide maneuverability to move through the forest. Their wingspan is 60-65cm (23.6-25.6in) across.


Females are much duller in color. Their feathers are a greenish or olive-brown color across their entire body.


Both genders have a short bill with a hooked shape.


Males are slightly larger than the females. On average an Andean cock-of-the-rock will measure 30-32cm (12-12.5in) long and weigh 200-275g (7-9.5oz).

Diet

The Andean cock-of-the-rock is an omnivore. Their diet includes a range of fruits, berries and insects. Small vertebrates may also be eaten on occasion.

They perform an important role in dispersing seeds from fruits they eat through the forest.

andean-cock-of-the-rock

Scientific Name

Rupicola peruvianus

Conservation Status

Least Concern

Weight

200-275g (7-9.5oz)

Length

30-32cm (12-12.5in)

Wingspan

60-65cm (23.6-25.6in)

Lifespan

Average 7 years

Diet

Omnivorous

Range

South America is the native home of the Andean cock-of-the-rock. Here they can be found throughout Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. As their name suggests they live in parts of the Andes Mountain range.

Habitat

They make their home in forests and wetlands. In addition to these they can be found in rocky gorges and ravines on the borders of rivers and streams. This habitat led to the rock portion of their name.

andean-cock-of-the-rock

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Reproduction

Breeding occurs from February to July though this can vary across parts of their range.


Males will gather at a location known as a lek. Here up to 15 males will compete for the mating rights of a single family. A number of males will glare at one another before one dips its head and lets out their raucous call. The others begin to join before a display of wing-flapping and head bouncing occurs. Females may approach the males throughout and their displays intensify at this point.


Young males will participate in the lek before sexual maturity to try and learn the ways to be successful.


Once a female selects the male she would like to mate with she will walk behind him and nibble at his feathers or peck his neck.


Males will return to the lek after mating and try to attract another a mate.


Females create a nest from mud, palm fiber and saliva which is shaped like a cup. This is built against a rock or in a cave. It may take a month for her to perfect her nest and she will not mate till this is complete.


Following a successful mating the female will deposit two eggs in the nest which she incubates alone for their 22-28 day incubation. One clutch is produced each year.


At hatching the chicks are highly underdeveloped and the mother provides them with food. They require care for the next 45 days.

Behavior

The Andean cock-of-the-rock will make a range of vocalizations such as popping noises created by closing the bill.

andean-cock-of-the-rock

Predators and Threats

The main threat presented by humans to their survival is habitat loss. They may also be captured in small amounts for the pet trade.

Quick facts

The Andean cock-of-the-rock is the national bird of Peru.

Their genus name – Rupicola comes from the Latin word ‘rupe’ for rock and the suffix ‘cola’ meaning inhabitant.

Andean cock-of-the-rock

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Photo Credits

Top

Under License

Middle Top

By Jdpecuador at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16305199


Middle Bottom

By Flickr user chdwckvnstrsslhm . Photo uploaded to commons by user ltshears - Flickr here, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1833892


Bottom

By Bill Bouton from San Luis Obispo, CA, USA - Andean Cock of the Rock, Rupicola peruviana, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19895959

References

Burnie, D., 2011. Animal. 3rd ed. London: DK


Ambrose, J., 2015. Wildlife Of The World. 1st ed. London: Dorling Kindersley

Animals.sandiegozoo.org. 2020. Cock-Of-The-Rock | San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants. [online] Available at: <https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/animals/cock-rock> [Accessed 23 September 2020].


Dallas World Aquarium. 2020. Andean Cock-Of-The-Rock. [online] Available at: <https://dwazoo.com/animal/andean-cock-rock/> [Accessed 23 September 2020].


American Bird Conservancy. 2020. Andean Cock-Of-The-Rock | American Bird Conservancy. [online] Available at: <https://abcbirds.org/bird/andean-cock-of-the-rock/> [Accessed 23 September 2020].


Nhpbs.org. 2020. Andean Cock-Of-The-Rock - Rupicola Peruvianus | Wildlife Journal Junior. [online] Available at: <https://nhpbs.org/wild/andeancockoftheRock.asp> [Accessed 23 September 2020].


Bouglouan, N., 2020. Andean Cock-Of-The-Rock. [online] Oiseaux-birds.com. Available at: <http://www.oiseaux-birds.com/card-andean-cock-of-the-rock.html> [Accessed 23 September 2020].


BirdLife International. 2018. Rupicola peruvianus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2018: e.T22700974A130267257. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T22700974A130267257.en. Downloaded on 23 September 2020.

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