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Bald Uakari Fact File

Appearance

Bald uakaris are most noticeable for their face which is bare of fur and colored pink or dark red. The rest of the body is covered with long fur which is variable in color across their range. It may be almost white, orange or reddish-brown.

The red face is caused by a thin epidermis and a large number of capillaries under the skin. Unwell animals will become pale especially if infected with malaria which is common in their range.

They have a short tail compared to their body length which measures just 14-18.5cm (5.5-7.5in) long. In most subspecies this is the same color as the body though in one it is black.

Their body measures 38-57cm (15-22.5in) long. The average weight of a bald uakari is 3-3.5kg (6.5-7.75lbs).

Diet

The bald uakari is a herbivore. Fruit makes up the majority of their diet though this also includes seeds, leaves, flowers, nectar and on a rare occasion small animals. Nuts are also consumed with their large teeth being capable of opening the Brazil nut.

Most of their food is gathered in the trees though during times of food scarcity they will go to the forest floor and eat fallen fruits or roots.

bald uakari

Scientific Name

Cacajao calvus

Conservation Status

Vulnerable

Weight

3-3.5kg (6.5-7.75lbs)

Length

38-57cm (15-22.5in)

Lifespan

Wild 15-20 years

Diet

Herbivorous

Range

South America is the native home of the bald uakari. Here they can be found in Brazil and Peru. The population in Colombia is potentially extinct.

Habitat

They make their home in the Amazon river basin where they live in forests which are permanently or seasonally flooded. They often make their home near a water source such as rivers or lakes.

bald uakari

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Reproduction

Mating takes place between October and May. Female bald uakaris will emit scents which can be used to attract a mate. Mate selection is affected by the coloration of the face. Pale individuals are less likely to have mating success.

She will give birth to a single infant after a 182 day gestation period.

Weaning takes place between three and five months old with the young transitioning off of milk by eating soft fruit.

Sexual maturity is reached at 3 years old for females and 6 years old for males.

There is a 2 year gap between females giving birth.

Behavior

Bald uakaris will form a family troop composed of a group of males, females and their young. On average these groups will include 10-20 members though some include up to 100 animals at a time. These larger groups will divide down in to smaller groups when they go out foraging.

When excited or irritated the color of the face may become brighter.

A range of methods of communication have been observed among bald uakaris. They make a shriek to alert other troop members to predators. Their bald face makes it easy to communicate through facial expressions and they will also wag their short tail.

bald uakari

Predators and Threats

Humans affect the population of the bald uakari through habitat destruction and hunting. Due to their specialist habitat and feeding needs they affected by any disturbance.

Quick facts

There are four recognized subspecies of the bald uakari.

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Photo Credits

Top

By Marc Wisniak - Flickr, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27028166

Middle and Bottom

Public Domain

References

Burnie, D., 2011. Animal. 3rd ed. London: DK

Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens. 2020. Los Angeles Zoo And Botanical Garden | Uakari, Red. [online] Available at: <https://www.lazoo.org/animals/mammals/uakari/#1505504245499-f7eb9303-598f5866-4b4c> [Accessed 9 September 2020].

Veiga, L.M., Bowler, M., Silva Jr, J., Queiroz, H., Boubli, J. & Rylands, A.B. 2020. Cacajao calvus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020: e.T3416A17975917. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T3416A17975917.en. Downloaded on 09 September 2020.

National Geographic. 2020. Bald Uakari. [online] Available at: <https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/b/bald-uakari/> [Accessed 9 September 2020].

New England Primate Conservancy. 2020. Bald Uakari. [online] Available at: <https://www.neprimateconservancy.org/bald-uakari.html> [Accessed 9 September 2020].

Felton-Church, A. 2001. "Cacajao calvus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed September 09, 2020 at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Cacajao_calvus/

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